Google News Initiative Ad Transformation Lab Provides Needed Support for Black, Latino Media BlackPressUSA – Black Press USA

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#NNPA BlackPress

NNPA NEWSWIRE — In addition to the more than 230-member NNPA, the National Association of Hispanic Publications (NAHP), and the Association of Alternative News Media also are included in the initiative. The program directly supports Black and Latino-owned news organizations and publishers who focus on serving underrepresented communities in America and Canada.

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In the Google News Initiative Labs, news organizations’ cohorts come together over several months to tackle specific business problems, with support from Google and industry experts. (Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)



In the Google News Initiative Labs, news organizations’ cohorts come together over several months to tackle specific business problems, with support from Google and industry experts. (Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent


@StacyBrownMedia

Google has announced a partnership for its Google News Initiative (GNI) Ad Transformation Lab, a program designed to help advance the digital transformation and advertising aspects of Black and Latino-owned news providers in the United States and Canada.

The tech giant rolled out the plan on Thursday, Nov 19, with a blog post by National Newspaper Publishers Association President (NNPA) and CEO, Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr.

In addition to the more than 230-member NNPA, the National Association of Hispanic Publications (NAHP), and the Association of Alternative News Media also are included in the initiative.

“The NNPA is pleased to join with NAHP and the Association of Alternative News Media as national trade associations dedicated to enhancing the sustainability of our member publishers, respectively,” Chavis remarked.

“The Google News Initiative Ad Transformation Lab is a timely opportunity for us to acquire best practices that will increase financial profitability in the expanding digital media space.”

To support the GNI program, Google has sponsored a new position for the NNPA.

The association will hire a Digital Specialist, who will collaborate between the Press Association Partners and GNI, as well as advancing the digital capabilities of NNPA’s members and the NNPA Digital Network.

In a job posting on November 18, 2020, the NNPA noted that it’s looking for a candidate with a strong knowledge of digital tools and a track record of working in a decision-making business role at a digitally forward news organization.

“In partnering with the NAHP, whose members span the country, with a concentration in areas of large Latino populations, we’ve seen a need to bring this type of support to our communities,” NAHP President Fanny Miller commented.

“And they say it’s crucial to provide professional development that focuses on adopting new advertising technology. Increased digital revenue will help expand audiences, build capacity and further the recognition and usage of Latino publications.”

Nathalie Sajous, Google’s Director of News and Publishing, Global Partnerships, said its relationship with the media associations dates back a while.

“There was a common challenge that many Black and Latinx publishers were facing,” Sajous added.

“The businesses were not set up to take advantage of digital advertising at scale. We wanted to make sure we drive systemic change.”

She continued:

“It came through conversations and the recognition of patterns. There was a specific need we wanted to address. The Google News Initiative has many programs – specific needs we wanted to address with this audience, with respect to advertising. That’s the focus.”

Sajous noted that Google has numerous programs to support the digital space.

Those programs include:

  • GNI Innovation Challenge: A global fund to kickstart innovation in news organizations on locally relevant issues. In North America, we announced funding for projects focused on diversity, equity and inclusion in journalism.
  • Support Local News campaign: In partnership with Local Media Association and Local Media Consortium, we launched a marketing campaign in June to “Support Local News.” This program delivered funding to thousands of local news outlets in the U.S. and Canada, including Black- and Latino-owned publishers, and reached tens of millions of people with our call to action to subscribe, donate and advertise.
  • Google Marketing: Google’s CMO recently shared four ways we’re supporting news publishers with our own marketing campaigns, including a $100M global marketing commitment to spend with the news category, including Black- and Latino- owned publishers.

In the Google News Initiative Labs, news organizations’ cohorts come together over several months to tackle specific business problems, with support from Google and industry experts.

Participants from each news organization receive customized consulting, learn from peers who face similar business problems, and implement specific steps to advance their goals.

Additional partners of the GNI Ad Transformation Lab include digital consultant 10up and the Local Media Association, which will serve as an advisory to the program.

Along with Google, these industry organizations will bring the publishers expertise in acquiring digital advertising training and upgrading technology platforms to accelerate effective, efficient, and engaging digital advertising and programmatic strategies.

“The way users are consuming news today is online,” Sajous remarked. “They come to Google, and they are expecting to find information that they can trust. Quality journalism matters, and it’s essential to people around the world. The goal of the Google News Initiative is to make sure that all have a voice. Our goal is to ensure that there is sustainability in Black and Latinx newspapers.”

A Little About Me: I’m the co-author of Blind Faith: The Miraculous Journey of Lula Hardaway and her son, Stevie Wonder (Simon & Schuster) and Michael Jackson: The Man Behind The Mask, An Insider’s Account of the King of Pop (Select Books Publishing, Inc.)

My work can often be found in the Washington Informer, Baltimore Times, Philadelphia Tribune, Pocono Record, the New York Post, and Black Press USA.

#NNPA BlackPress

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “On a daily basis, police officers are prosecution witnesses in nearly every criminal case. Prosecutors and police rely upon and collaborate,” April Preyar, a criminal defense and civil rights attorney in Chicago, told NNPA Newswire. “Prosecutors are reluctant to try to secure a conviction against someone who has essentially been their partner in the criminal courts. Further, prosecutors know what judges and jurors alike favor cops,” Preyar observed.

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11 hours ago

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April 19, 2021

Recent data made public by a Bowling Green State University criminologist revealed that police officers who are charged with committing murder or manslaughter are more likely to win an acquittal – if they are prosecuted at all.

Recent data made public by a Bowling Green State University criminologist revealed that police officers who are charged with committing murder or manslaughter are more likely to win an acquittal – if they are prosecuted at all.

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent


@StacyBrownMedia

As Derek Chauvin listened to formerly fellow officers, EMT workers, and civilian witnesses repeatedly issue damaging testimony, the former Minneapolis cop knew he still had more than a fighting chance at an acquittal in the death of George Floyd.

He has American history and a wealth of statistics that suggest a favorable outcome in spite of what some witnesses have testified — and the irrefutable video evidence that shows he alone caused Floyd’s death.

Recent data made public by a Bowling Green State University criminologist revealed that police officers who are charged with committing murder or manslaughter are more likely to win an acquittal – if they are prosecuted at all.

According to statistics provided to the Washington Post this month by Philip M. Stinson at Bowling Green, between 2005 and 2015, more than 1,400 officers were arrested for a violence-related crime committed on duty.

“In 187 of those cases, victims were fatally injured in shootings or from other causes. The officers charged represent a fraction of the hundreds of thousands of police officers working for about 18,000 departments nationwide,” Stinson reported.

“Police charged with committing violent crimes while on duty were convicted more than half the time during that period. In the most serious cases — those involving murder or manslaughter — the conviction rate was lower, hovering around 50 percent,” the report continued.

What’s more, although half of the people shot and killed by police are White, African Americans are shot at a disproportionate rate – accounting for less than 13 percent of the population, police kill Black people at more than twice the rate of White Americans.

“The public has witnessed case after case where an officer is recorded brazenly shooting and killing an unarmed Black person and is not arrested or charged for these crimes,” Johnathan Spencer Perkins, a public academic, higher education attorney, lecturer, and podcast host, told NNPA Newswire.

“In most states, police are immune from financial liability. This means they can behave however they’d like, without fear of an outside lawsuit,” Perkins remarked, noting that “study after respected study has found that Black people are 3-to-5 times more likely to be stopped, arrested, hurt, and killed by police.”

Chauvin did not shoot Floyd, but his actions were consistent with those of other officers whose behaviors led to physical confrontations between African Americans and law enforcement. An unfortunate reality in this scenario is that police work closely with prosecutors thta are reluctant to upset the relationship by prosecuting officers, some experts said.

“On a daily basis, police officers are prosecution witnesses in nearly every criminal case. Prosecutors and police rely upon and collaborate,” April Preyar, a criminal defense and civil rights attorney in Chicago, told NNPA Newswire.

“Prosecutors are reluctant to try to secure a conviction against someone who has essentially been their partner in the criminal courts. Further, prosecutors know what judges and jurors alike favor cops,” Preyar observed.

She continued:

“Potential jurors often admit during voir dire that they will believe an officer who they have never met before over any civilian witness who may hit the stand. Further, the Fraternal Order of Police carries a great deal of clout in the political process.

“Judges often don’t want to get bad press from the FOP by convicting one of its own. Lastly, prosecutors often have difficulty finding an appropriate statute to charge an officer who committed a crime while on duty. The laws are written with civilians in mind. Often this gives dirty cops a loophole which they can avoid prosecution and subsequent conviction, regardless of how egregious their actions were.”

There is an inherent conflict of interest in a prosecutor working to convict a law enforcement officer because these are the same law enforcement officers whom the prosecutors work with daily, added Kris Parker, a criminal defense attorney and former Tampa Bay, Florida prosecutor.

“Law enforcement officers and prosecutors have working and personal relationships that require trust. When a District or State Attorney prosecutes a police officer, one has to wonder if the prosecutor is doing so with the same zeal that they would any other defendant,” Parker weighed.

“Are they showing the same passion in making their argument to a grand jury? Are they prosecuting tenaciously or merely going through the motions, granting their co-workers the benefit of the doubt?

“In theory, a prosecutor seeks justice on behalf of the people whom they represent, regardless of the identity of the defendant. In reality, prosecutors are humans who possess emotion and possess established loyalties.

“And these human characteristics can make a prosecutor feel compassion for someone he or she shares a common bond. This compassion can lead to a weaker level of prosecution that another defendant might experience when facing criminal charges.”

#NNPA BlackPress

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “This gun violence in our neighborhood is having a profound impact on our children, even if they’re never involved in pulling the trigger or being the victim of — on the other side of a trigger,” President Biden said.

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April 19, 2021

Vice President Harris said she had seen gun violence up close. “I have looked at autopsy photographs. I have seen with my own two eyes what a bullet can do to the human body,” the vice president noted. (Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)

Vice President Harris said she had seen gun violence up close. “I have looked at autopsy photographs. I have seen with my own two eyes what a bullet can do to the human body,” the vice president noted. (Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent


@StacyBrownMedia

Determining that “enough is enough,” President Joe Biden announced a series of executive actions to reduce gun violence.

Vice President Kamala Harris joined the commander-in-chief in calling on Congress to pass more extensive gun-control legislation.

“This is an epidemic, for God’s sake, and it has to stop,” President Biden remarked outside of the White House in the Rose Garden.

Vice President Harris said she had seen gun violence up close.

“I have looked at autopsy photographs. I have seen with my own two eyes what a bullet can do to the human body,” the vice president noted.

“I have held hands with the hands of parents who have lost a child. I have seen children who were traumatized by the loss of a parent or sibling. And I have fought my entire career to end this violence and to pass reasonable gun safety laws.”

Vice President Harris continued:

“Time and again, as progress has stalled, we have all asked, ‘What are we waiting for?’ Because we aren’t waiting for a tragedy; I know that. We’ve had more tragedy than we can bear. We aren’t waiting for solutions either because the solutions exist. They already exist.”

The executive orders issued include:

  • Directing the Justice Department (DOJ) to propose a rule within 30 days to help stop ghost guns’ proliferation – firearms assembled from kits that often lack serial numbers and are difficult to trace.
  • Directing the DOJ to craft a rule within 60 days, which clarifies the point at which a stabilizing arm brace effectively turns a pistol into a short-barreled rifle, subjecting that firearm to additional regulations.
  • Directing the DOJ to publish within 60 days, model red-flag legislation, which lets law enforcement officers or family members ask a court to bar someone from accessing guns under certain circumstances temporarily. The White House says the model legislation will make it easier for states to pass their own versions of that law.
  • Directing the DOJ to issue a comprehensive report on gun trafficking.
  • The actions arrive after several recent mass shootings in the United States, including South Carolina, on April 7.

In that incident, former NFL player Phillip Adams murdered five people, including two young children, at a doctor’s home.

Phillips then fatally shot himself.

“This gun violence in our neighborhood is having a profound impact on our children, even if they’re never involved in pulling the trigger or being the victim of — on the other side of a trigger,” President Biden said.

“For a fraction of the cost of gun violence, we can save lives, create safe and healthy communities, and build economies that work for all of us, and save billions of American dollars.”

#NNPA BlackPress

NNPA NEWSWIRE _ “Just as elections have consequences, so do the actions of those who are elected,” Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms wrote on Twitter. “Unfortunately, the removal of the @MLB All-Star game from GA is likely the 1st of many dominoes to fall until the unnecessary barriers put in place to restrict access to the ballot box are removed,” the mayor stated.

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12 hours ago

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April 19, 2021

“Major League Baseball fundamentally supports voting rights for all Americans and opposes restrictions to the ballot box,” said MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred.

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent


@StacyBrownMedia

Elections and the actions of lawmakers do have consequences.

And because of a new voter suppression bill signed into law by Gov. Brian Kemp, Major League Baseball has announced it would move its potentially lucrative 2021 All-Star game from Atlanta.

“Just as elections have consequences, so do the actions of those who are elected,” Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms wrote on Twitter.

“Unfortunately, the removal of the @MLB All-Star game from GA is likely the 1st of many dominoes to fall until the unnecessary barriers put in place to restrict access to the ballot box are removed,” the mayor stated.

MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred decided on Friday, April 2, after Major League Baseball Players Association executive director Tony Clark and some prominent players and managers expressed doubts about attending the game.

Last month, Kemp signed Republican-led legislation that disenfranchises voters of color.

As reported recently at BlackPressUSA.com, moving the game from Atlanta could cost the city and local counties as much as $200 million in revenue.

The host Atlanta Braves were expected to operate their stadium at total capacity for the game.

Events surrounding the mid-summer classic would have meant a windfall for the local economy.

“Over the last week, we have engaged in thoughtful conversations with Clubs, former and current players, the Players Association, and The Players Alliance, among others, to listen to their views,” Manfred said.

“I have decided that the best way to demonstrate our values as a sport is by relocating this year’s All-Star Game and MLB Draft.”

U.S. Sen. Raphael Warnock (D-Georgia) expressed hope that MLB would reconsider moving the game because of the economic impact it could have, mainly because the pandemic has crippled most businesses.

“Businesses and organizations have great power in their voices and ability to push for change. I respect the decision of the players to speak out against this unjust law,” Sen. Warnock stated.

“It is not the people of Georgia or the workers of Georgia who crafted this law. It is politicians seeking to retain power at the expense of Georgians’ voices. And today’s decision by MLB is the unfortunate consequence of these politicians’ actions.”

Sen. Warnock continued:

“It is my hope that businesses, athletes, and entertainers can protest this law not by leaving Georgia but by coming here and fighting voter suppression head-on, and hand-in-hand with the community. Additionally, the urgency to pass federal voter protection laws grows every day, and I will continue to be a leader in that fight.”

As first noted by CNBC, Georgia’s new law adds guidelines around mail-in ballots, voter registration and provides state officials more authority around how elections are operated.

“Major League Baseball fundamentally supports voting rights for all Americans and opposes restrictions to the ballot box,” Manfred said.

“In 2020, MLB became the first professional sports league to join the non-partisan Civic Alliance to help build a future in which everyone participates in shaping the United States.

“We proudly used our platform to encourage baseball fans and communities throughout our country to perform their civic duty and actively participate in the voting process. Fair access to voting continues to have our game’s unwavering support.”

#NNPA BlackPress

NNPA NEWSWIRE — On National Healthcare Decisions Day, I want to share the importance of compassionate death in the Black community, including hospice care. Hospice is a set of services designed to treat symptoms and side effects, improve quality of life, support families and address spiritual needs. It occurs during the last 6 months of life, after treatment of the life-limiting disease has stopped.

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April 19, 2021

Hospice and palliative care benefit thousands of people at the end of their lives, but Black people continue to utilize it at lower rates than their white counterparts.

Hospice and palliative care benefit thousands of people at the end of their lives, but Black people continue to utilize it at lower rates than their White counterparts.

By Ottamissiah “Missy” Moore

I’ve been a nurse for 33 years and have spent 25 of those years caring for people in hospice. In 2017, my son, Demitrice was diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer, and suddenly hospice came home. I knew we didn’t have a lot of time left together, and I wanted to spend every moment with my son. That’s why hospice was the right choice for Demitrice and our family.

On National Healthcare Decisions Day, I want to share the importance of compassionate death in the Black community, including hospice care. Hospice is a set of services designed to treat symptoms and side effects, improve quality of life, support families and address spiritual needs. It occurs during the last 6 months of life, after treatment of the life-limiting disease has stopped.

In the days after we chose hospice, a doctor, nurses, a social worker, and a chaplain visited our home and lent us the care and support that Demitrice needed to avoid suffering while being surrounded by loved ones. Because of hospice, I was able to focus on my son in his last days.

Those days were filled with watching movies and eating homemade chocolate chip cookies. Hospice meant that Demitrice could truly live until he died, and that every moment was spent with his loved ones. He also avoided the suffering associated with cancer because hospice reduced his symptoms and kept him comfortable.

There is evidence that Demitrice’s experience isn’t unique. Hospice and palliative care benefit thousands of people at the end of their lives, but Black people continue to utilize it at lower rates than their White counterparts. A recent Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) study found that 34.9% of Black study participants died using hospice services compared with 46.2% of White participants. This disparity echoes the disparities that occur throughout the lives of Black people, from being less likely to receive pain medications, to dying at higher rates in childbirth.

The causes of this disparity in hospice use are varied — from racism and unconscious bias to a lack of trust in the medical system. Black people are also less likely to fill out an advance directive, which speaks for a person when they can’t speak for themselves. The hospice workers helped us put Demitrice’s affairs in order and fill out an advance directive, including a chaplain who shared his spiritual wisdom.

But you don’t have to wait until you get sick to share your wishes for the end of life with your loved ones. National Healthcare Decisions Day is a time for families to discuss and consider their end-of-life options in the event that someone gets sick. The national nonprofit Compassion & Choices offers free tools and resources on planning for the end of life for individuals and their families, including an End of Life Decision Guide and Toolkit that walks you through the steps of identifying your wishes and conveying them to others.

I hope that Demitrice’s story helps others make decisions about their end-of-life care. He died surrounded by myself and my son, peacefully and at home.

Ottamissiah “Missy” Moore is a nurse, consultant & community activist based in Washington, DC.

#NNPA BlackPress

NNPA NEWSWIRE — “In meeting this moment, we can take inspiration and guidance from the collective victories of earlier generations,” writes Imani Countess and William Minter, of the US-Africa Bridge Building Project, a Washington DC-based nonprofit geared toward fostering transnational solidarity primarily around economic justice. “We must take seriously the truth that none of us are free until all of us are free.”

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April 19, 2021

In both the Playbook and the focused work on tax justice, Countess says, the Project aims to provide information and analysis that is both thoughtful and actionable. (Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)

In both the Playbook and the focused work on tax justice, Countess says, the Project aims to provide information and analysis that is both thoughtful and actionable. (Photo: iStockphoto / NNPA)

WASHINGTON, DC — As the United States confronts the multitude of challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, a bright spotlight has been placed on the already gaping and growing inequalities far beyond the healthcare system, including housing, education, and the administration of justice. However, just like the virus, structural inequalities that disadvantage people by race, class, gender, or birthplace are not new or uniquely American problems.  According to the recently published essay, the solution requires an all-inclusive approach, “Confronting Global Apartheid Demands Global Solidarity.”

“In meeting this moment, we can take inspiration and guidance from the collective victories of earlier generations,” writes Imani Countess and William Minter, of the US-Africa Bridge Building Project, a Washington DC-based nonprofit geared toward fostering transnational solidarity primarily around economic justice. “We must take seriously the truth that none of us are free until all of us are free.”

The essay and the Project’s mission draw on the work of a diverse cadre of activists and movement—domestic and international—that successfully bridged divisions by race, class, gender and national borders by first focusing on justice for all.

“The most important principle of transnational solidarity is recognizing common humanity,” says Countess, the Project’s founder and director.  While that sounds simple, she says, it requires dispensing with the belief that our struggles in the US are wholly unique, when in fact, communities all around the world are confronting the same or similar issues. “We’re not trying to persuade folks in Atlanta or Minneapolis to shift their gaze to look at how they can influence US national policy around a country in Africa. Rather, I’m saying to folks in Los Angeles or Atlanta, of course your economic inequality struggles have local dimensions.  But they reflect global problems that require an internationalist perspective, so let’s share information and strategies.”

Countess said the Project, which she launched in January, is focused on strengthening existing ties and making new links to forge transnational alliances between local economic justice activists in the United States and Africa. The Project’s primary issue focus is working to end corruption and tax injustice by linking local struggles and global problems and promoting mutual solidarity between Africans and Americans. Initially, the Project will publish a series of essays as part of a Transnational Solidarity Playbook, exploring transnational topics including racial, environmental, and climate justice, as well as women’s rights, LGBTQ+ rights, and workers’ rights. The series is based on the premise that progressives must increase their “capacity and join forces across national borders, defeat authoritarian regimes and movements based on hate, and find the strength to build a future based on common humanity and justice for all.”

The first essay is set against the backdrop of the anti-Apartheid and African liberation movements of the 60s, 70s, 80s, and early 90s, culminating in Nelson Mandela’s release from prison and the ushering-in of democracy in South Africa.

In both the Playbook and the focused work on tax justice, Countess says, the Project aims to provide information and analysis that is both thoughtful and actionable. The goals include influencing public discourse and contributing to reflection among progressive activists involved in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

#LetItBeKnown

NNPA NEWSWIRE — The 7: 30 a.m. EST interview will air over several social media platforms, including facebook.com/blackpressusa/videos, youtube.com/c/blackpressusatv, and on Twitter @BlackPressUSA. “Dr. Walensky is looking forward to the interview with the Black Press to talk about these vital issues,” a spokesperson for the CDC noted.

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April 19, 2021

“The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in the death of over 500,000 Americans. Tens of millions have been infected,” said Dr. Rochelle Walensky, the 19th CDC director and ninth administrator of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent


@StacyBrownMedia

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has remained vigilant in the fight against the coronavirus, tracking the different variants of the disease and studying the complications some have found with the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine.

At the forefront is CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky, whose schedule includes regular White House updates and testimony before congressional panels.

Dr. Walensky also led the federal agency this month in officially declaring racism as a public health threat.

On Wednesday, April 21, Dr. Walensky plans to sit for a special interview with the National Newspaper Publishers Association’s (NNPA) “Let It Be Known” live breaking-news morning program.

The NNPA is the trade association for the 230 African American newspapers and media companies that comprise the Black Press of America.

The 7: 30 a.m. EST interview will air over several social media platforms, including facebook.com/blackpressusa/videos, youtube.com/c/blackpressusatv, and on Twitter @BlackPressUSA.

“Dr. Walensky is looking forward to the interview with the Black Press to talk about these vital issues,” a spokesperson for the CDC noted.

The CDC’s independent vaccine advisory panel plans to convene by week’s end to discuss safety information regarding some blood-clotting cases in recipients of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

The government has paused the use of the vaccine until it gathers further guidance.

Reportedly, about 5,800 breakthrough infections have occurred in the approximately 77 million individuals in the country who have received full vaccination.

The CDC has reminded everyone that no vaccine is 100 percent effective against the virus, but incidents like that occurring in a few with the Johnson & Johnson vaccine are rare.

Dr. Walensky, the 19th CDC director and ninth administrator of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, also declared racism a public health crisis.

She is expected to discuss her determination during the interview with the Black Press.

“What we know is this: racism is a serious public health threat that directly affects the well-being of millions of Americans,” asserted Dr. Walensky, who also counts as an influential scholar whose pioneering research has helped advance the national and global response to HIV/AIDS.

The declaration marks the first time that the CDC has taken such a bold position on race in America.

In doing so, Dr. Walensky highlighted several new efforts the CDC is leading to accelerating the work in addressing racism as a fundamental driver of racial and ethnic health inequities in the United States.

Dr. Walensky also unveiled a new website called “Racism and Health” that will serve as a hub for the agency’s efforts and a catalyst for greater education and dialogue around these critical issues.

She posited that racism affects everyone.

“It affects the health of our entire nation,” Dr. Walensky wrote in a statement.

“Racism is not just the discrimination against one group based on the color of their skin or their race or ethnicity, but the structural barriers that impact racial and ethnic groups differently to influence where a person lives, where they work, where their children play, and where they worship and gather in community. These social determinants of health have lifelong negative effects on the mental and physical health of individuals in communities of color.”

Since the pandemic outbreak more than one year ago, the United States has recorded over 31 million cases of the coronavirus and more than 560,000 deaths.

African Americans and other communities of color have been adversely affected.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in the death of over 500,000 Americans. Tens of millions have been infected,” Dr. Walensky added.

“And across this country, people are suffering. Importantly, these painful experiences and the impact of COVID-19 are felt, most severely, in communities of color – communities that have experienced disproportionate case counts and deaths and where the social impact of the pandemic has been most extreme.”

Dr. Walensky continued:

“Yet, the disparities seen over the past year were not a result of COVID-19. Instead, the pandemic illuminated inequities that have existed for generations and revealed for all of America a known, but often unaddressed, epidemic impacting public health: racism.”

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